Grand Canyon Caverns, the Oldest, Deepest, Darkest, Quietest, and Largest Hotel Room in the World


How would you like to spend a night at the deepest, darkest, oldest, quietest, and the largest hotel room in the world? Well, if you are interested, you can visit the Grand Canyon Caverns Cave Room and enjoy this once-in-a-lifetime experience. But make sure you have $800 to spare, as that is the amount that you will require to spend one night in this amazing and unique suite. Read on if you wish to find out more about this amazing place.

The world’s oldest, darkest, deepest, quietest, and largest suite lies 200 feet below ground in a 65-million-year-old cave. To get into this unique suite, you have to take a lift down to a depth which is the same as the height of a 22-story-building.

he Grand Canyon Cavern Cave Suite Room
The Grand Canyon Cavern Cave Suite Room. Image Credit: Official Website of the Grand Canyon Caverns

“Imagine, if you can, spending the night in the oldest, darkest, deepest, quietest, and largest suite in the world. Completely absent of any light, so quiet because it contains no life forms; nothing lives in the caverns, not a fly, not a mouse, a bat, bug or animal. Nothing. The only thing moving or breathing is you.” This is how the Grand Canyon Caverns website defines the experience that would await you if you dared book a room 200 feet underground.

Yes, the world’s deepest suite is 200 feet below ground and is located in the Grand Canyon Caverns of Peach Springs, Arizona. The suite is regarded as one of the most 10 unusual places to sleep in the world. Vistors are required to take an elevator and go down a distance almost equal to the height of a 22-story-building to reach the room. Since it’s so far below ground, it’s the darkest room you can ever imagine. It is 220 feet by 400 feet, with a 70-foot ceiling making it the largest room in the world as well. And if that’s not enough for you, it’s the quietest room in the world with the only living being there being the visitors, surrounded by walls that are 65 million years old. Sounds like it’s straight out of a horror movie, doesn’t it?

According to history, Walter Peck fell through a hole and discovered the underground cavern. He immediately purchased the property in hopes of finding gold there, but to his disappointment, there were no riches under there. He then turned it into a tourist destination.

The Entrance to the Grand Canyon Cavern Suite Room
The Entrance to the Grand Canyon Cavern Suite Room. Image Credit: Lauri Väin via Flickr

As per the legend, Walter Peck is the one that discovered these amazing underground caverns in 1927. According to most popular beliefs, Peck stumbled down a hole that led him to the network of caverns. They were located about 50 miles from the Grand Canyon and directly connected to it. The caverns he found were the largest dry caverns in the whole of the United States. This means they do not contain any water, so there is no formation of stalagmites and stalactites, the structures formed by dripping water that you see in other caverns.

When Peck ended up in the caverns, he thought the sparkly walls would definitely contain gold. He purchased the property but soon discovered that the caverns held no such riches. But having an entrepreneurial spirit, Peck didn’t just let the caverns he bought go to waste. He started charging people money for tours into the caverns. Over the years, the caverns became the property of numerous owners. Even the name of the caverns has changed over the years like the Yampa Caverns, the Coconino Caverns, and the Dinosaur Caverns. As of 2001, the property belongs to a group of friends. Apart from the world’s most unique suite, the caverns also offer an RV Park, a frisbee golf course, and a restaurant. The grounds above the caverns are lined with dinosaur statues to give a prehistoric atmosphere.

The current owners were responsible for the creation of  The Cavern Suite. The work to create this suite started in 2010 and took almost four months to complete. The owners would say that their dream has been successful as the room is booked for almost 200 days every year.

People pay $800 for a night at the cavern suite. The room is well-equipped with the basic necessities of a normal hotel room. Adventurous visitors can even use flashlights to explore the cavern on their own.

Stairs in the Grand Canyon Caverns
Stairs in the Grand Canyon Caverns. Image Credit: Lauri Väin via Flickr

If you think staying down below the ground would be cheap, then think again. The Grand Canyon Cavern Cave Room costs $800 for two guests per day. For every additional day, they charge $100 more and a maximum of six people are allowed. Since the cavern is so large and there are regular tours into the place, the famous cavern “room” is tucked into one of the corners. It is not like an actual room but just enclosed by a short wooden fence that makes it look like a courtyard.

The room has been equipped with two queen beds. There is also a couch that folds out into a king-size bed. A kitchenette area is provided with a microwave, a fridge, and a Keurig. The room is lit with lights, and both hot and cold water is available for a shower. Apart from that, there’s a restroom that can accommodate seven to eight flushes. Since there is no provision for water to come inside the cavern, the staff has to carry in all the water for the visitors. Also, an attendant sleeps on the ground above, and he can be reached at any time via a walkie-talkie. Guests have full access to control the elevator and come and go as they please. Visitors can enjoy a movie or two when they are staying for the night.

Gilbert Casados, the head of tour guides at the caverns, says that typically the majority of their guests are families who stay just for a single night to enjoy the experience. But from time to time, they also have to entertain film and TV crews. Once, Scottish actor Billy Connolly stayed in the cavern room.

The numerous underground dry caverns have been used for various purposes such as fallout shelters and storage for food and provisions. There has also been a discovery of mummified remains of prehistoric creatures. 

The Grand Canyon Caverns used as fallout shelters
The Grand Canyon Caverns used as fallout shelters. Image Credit: Lauri Väin via Flickr

The network of caverns associated with the Grand Canyons has been used for numerous purposes other than tourism. At the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis, the caverns were used as a fallout shelter that housed and protected over 200 people. Moreover, food supplies and provisions were stored underground. Surprisingly, the food supplies have not yet been removed and are still underground.

The cavern also houses the mummified remains of a bobcat which have been named “Bob the Bobcat.” There is also a prehistoric skeleton of a giant sloth which was named “Gertie” who left cut marks on the wall where it tried to escape the depth and darkness of the caverns. Also, people who visited the caverns before the Cave Room was established have left behind some items which the cavern now proudly displays.

cr: unusual-stories


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Grand Canyon Caverns, the Oldest, Deepest, Darkest, Quietest, and Largest Hotel Room in the World

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